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Shipping fuel regulation to cut sulphur levels comes into force

The 1st of January 2020 is when the new international shipping regulation comes into force which will cut the air pollution from ships. The fuel must now be refined to remove basic impurities before it is used by ships. This is good news.

The bad news is that it has taken so long to achieve, if indeed it is successfully implemented. If the UN funded International Maritime Organisation had sufficient authority then the world could have passed this milestone in cleaner fuel for ships decades ago. Humanity cannot afford to waste time, we should agree on a global system of co-operation.

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Today’s Blog

Johnson is a fascist

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Oh my god mobile

Edited by Robodroid, under contract to Pytho

65 million years ago

An asteroid did hit and explode

Burning Fire, Water turned to steam

End of the world. The dinosaurs dream all gone

Bringing the chaos to their earthly home

Skies full of debris. No sunlight on the land

Volcanoes exploding it’s getting out of hand

Impact crater. Blood red sun

Dust in the air it ain’t no fun

65 million years ago

An asteroid did hit and explode

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Whatsup?

Whats this

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Climate crisis

At the meeting, Ms Heine commented: “Water covers much of our land at one or other point of the year as we fight rising tides. As we speak hundreds of people have evacuated their homes after large waves caused the ocean to inundate parts of our capital in Majuro last week.”

She added: “It’s a fight to the death for anyone not prepared to flee. As a nation we refuse to flee. But we also refuse to die.”

The world’s average surface temperature is rising rapidly because human activities release greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2). These gases trap heat in the atmosphere, a bit like the glass roof of a greenhouse.

At the meeting, Ms Heine commented: “Water covers much of our land at one or other point of the year as we fight rising tides. As we speak hundreds of people have evacuated their homes after large waves caused the ocean to inundate parts of our capital in Majuro last week.”

She added: “It’s a fight to the death for anyone not prepared to flee. As a nation we refuse to flee. But we also refuse to die.”

Spain then stepped in to host the event, which will see 29,000 attendees over the two weeks of talks.

The world’s average surface temperature is rising rapidly because human activities release greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2). These gases trap heat in the atmosphere, a bit like the glass roof of a greenhouse.

At the meeting, Ms Heine commented: “Water covers much of our land at one or other point of the year as we fight rising tides. As we speak hundreds of people have evacuated their homes after large waves caused the ocean to inundate parts of our capital in Majuro last week.”

She added: “It’s a fight to the death for anyone not prepared to flee. As a nation we refuse to flee. But we also refuse to die.”

This conference of the parties, or COP25, was due to be held in Chile but was cancelled by the government due to weeks of civil disturbances.

Spain then stepped in to host the event, which will see 29,000 attendees over the two weeks of talks.

The world’s average surface temperature is rising rapidly because human activities release greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2). These gases trap heat in the atmosphere, a bit like the glass roof of a greenhouse.

At the meeting, Ms Heine commented: “Water covers much of our land at one or other point of the year as we fight rising tides. As we speak hundreds of people have evacuated their homes after large waves caused the ocean to inundate parts of our capital in Majuro last week.”

She added: “It’s a fight to the death for anyone not prepared to flee. As a nation we refuse to flee. But we also refuse to die.”

Political leaders and climate diplomats are meeting in Madrid for two weeks of talks amid a growing sense of crisis.

This conference of the parties, or COP25, was due to be held in Chile but was cancelled by the government due to weeks of civil disturbances.

Spain then stepped in to host the event, which will see 29,000 attendees over the two weeks of talks.

The world’s average surface temperature is rising rapidly because human activities release greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2). These gases trap heat in the atmosphere, a bit like the glass roof of a greenhouse.

At the meeting, Ms Heine commented: “Water covers much of our land at one or other point of the year as we fight rising tides. As we speak hundreds of people have evacuated their homes after large waves caused the ocean to inundate parts of our capital in Majuro last week.”

She added: “It’s a fight to the death for anyone not prepared to flee. As a nation we refuse to flee. But we also refuse to die.”

But President Hilda Heine said the Pacific nation had been fighting rising tides even before last week’s disaster.

Political leaders and climate diplomats are meeting in Madrid for two weeks of talks amid a growing sense of crisis.

This conference of the parties, or COP25, was due to be held in Chile but was cancelled by the government due to weeks of civil disturbances.

Spain then stepped in to host the event, which will see 29,000 attendees over the two weeks of talks.

The world’s average surface temperature is rising rapidly because human activities release greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2). These gases trap heat in the atmosphere, a bit like the glass roof of a greenhouse.

At the meeting, Ms Heine commented: “Water covers much of our land at one or other point of the year as we fight rising tides. As we speak hundreds of people have evacuated their homes after large waves caused the ocean to inundate parts of our capital in Majuro last week.”

She added: “It’s a fight to the death for anyone not prepared to flee. As a nation we refuse to flee. But we also refuse to die.”

Powerful swells averaging 5m (16ft) washed across the capital of the Marshall Islands, Majuro, last week.

But President Hilda Heine said the Pacific nation had been fighting rising tides even before last week’s disaster.

Political leaders and climate diplomats are meeting in Madrid for two weeks of talks amid a growing sense of crisis.

This conference of the parties, or COP25, was due to be held in Chile but was cancelled by the government due to weeks of civil disturbances.

Spain then stepped in to host the event, which will see 29,000 attendees over the two weeks of talks.

The world’s average surface temperature is rising rapidly because human activities release greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2). These gases trap heat in the atmosphere, a bit like the glass roof of a greenhouse.

At the meeting, Ms Heine commented: “Water covers much of our land at one or other point of the year as we fight rising tides. As we speak hundreds of people have evacuated their homes after large waves caused the ocean to inundate parts of our capital in Majuro last week.”

She added: “It’s a fight to the death for anyone not prepared to flee. As a nation we refuse to flee. But we also refuse to die.”

The president of an island nation on the frontline of climate change says it is in a “fight to the death” after freak waves inundated the capital.

Powerful swells averaging 5m (16ft) washed across the capital of the Marshall Islands, Majuro, last week.

But President Hilda Heine said the Pacific nation had been fighting rising tides even before last week’s disaster.

Political leaders and climate diplomats are meeting in Madrid for two weeks of talks amid a growing sense of crisis.

This conference of the parties, or COP25, was due to be held in Chile but was cancelled by the government due to weeks of civil disturbances.

Spain then stepped in to host the event, which will see 29,000 attendees over the two weeks of talks.

The world’s average surface temperature is rising rapidly because human activities release greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2). These gases trap heat in the atmosphere, a bit like the glass roof of a greenhouse.

At the meeting, Ms Heine commented: “Water covers much of our land at one or other point of the year as we fight rising tides. As we speak hundreds of people have evacuated their homes after large waves caused the ocean to inundate parts of our capital in Majuro last week.”

She added: “It’s a fight to the death for anyone not prepared to flee. As a nation we refuse to flee. But we also refuse to die.”

The president of an island nation on the frontline of climate change says it is in a “fight to the death” after freak waves inundated the capital.

Powerful swells averaging 5m (16ft) washed across the capital of the Marshall Islands, Majuro, last week.

But President Hilda Heine said the Pacific nation had been fighting rising tides even before last week’s disaster.

Political leaders and climate diplomats are meeting in Madrid for two weeks of talks amid a growing sense of crisis.

This conference of the parties, or COP25, was due to be held in Chile but was cancelled by the government due to weeks of civil disturbances.

Spain then stepped in to host the event, which will see 29,000 attendees over the two weeks of talks.

The world’s average surface temperature is rising rapidly because human activities release greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2). These gases trap heat in the atmosphere, a bit like the glass roof of a greenhouse.

At the meeting, Ms Heine commented: “Water covers much of our land at one or other point of the year as we fight rising tides. As we speak hundreds of people have evacuated their homes after large waves caused the ocean to inundate parts of our capital in Majuro last week.”

She added: “It’s a fight to the death for anyone not prepared to flee. As a nation we refuse to flee. But we also refuse to die.”

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London Bridge survivor: ‘I saw things I will never unsee’

Vigils for the victims of the attack were also held in Cambridge and Anglia Ruskin University, where Ms Jones had previously attended.

Mr Merritt and Ms Jones both studied for masters degrees at the University of Cambridge’s institute of criminology and had been taking part in an event for its Learning Together programme – which focuses on education within the criminal justice system – when they were killed.

  • Prime Minister Boris Johnson defended his response to the attack after Mr Merritt’s father criticised newspaper coverage of Mr Johnson’s pledge to review the early release of convicted terrorists
  • Mr Johnson and Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn attended a vigil at the Guildhall near London Bridge to honour those caught up in the attack
  • London Mayor Sadiq Khan said the best way to defeat the hatred shown in the attack was to focus on the values of hope, unity and love
  • BBC News learned the attacker, Usman Khan, 28, had been under investigation by the security service MI5 since his release from prison last year, but given one of the lowest priorities. He had been convicted of a terrorism offence in 2012
  • As part of his release conditions, Khan was obliged to take part in the government’s desistance and disengagement programme – which aims to rehabilitate those involved in terrorism

Vigils for the victims of the attack were also held in Cambridge and Anglia Ruskin University, where Ms Jones had previously attended.

Mr Merritt and Ms Jones both studied for masters degrees at the University of Cambridge’s institute of criminology and had been taking part in an event for its Learning Together programme – which focuses on education within the criminal justice system – when they were killed.

In other developments on Monday:

  • Prime Minister Boris Johnson defended his response to the attack after Mr Merritt’s father criticised newspaper coverage of Mr Johnson’s pledge to review the early release of convicted terrorists
  • Mr Johnson and Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn attended a vigil at the Guildhall near London Bridge to honour those caught up in the attack
  • London Mayor Sadiq Khan said the best way to defeat the hatred shown in the attack was to focus on the values of hope, unity and love
  • BBC News learned the attacker, Usman Khan, 28, had been under investigation by the security service MI5 since his release from prison last year, but given one of the lowest priorities. He had been convicted of a terrorism offence in 2012
  • As part of his release conditions, Khan was obliged to take part in the government’s desistance and disengagement programme – which aims to rehabilitate those involved in terrorism

Vigils for the victims of the attack were also held in Cambridge and Anglia Ruskin University, where Ms Jones had previously attended.

Mr Merritt and Ms Jones both studied for masters degrees at the University of Cambridge’s institute of criminology and had been taking part in an event for its Learning Together programme – which focuses on education within the criminal justice system – when they were killed.

“They stepped up and many of the folks in that space would not be here today if it weren’t for these guys who did time in prison and literally saved lives.”

In other developments on Monday:

  • Prime Minister Boris Johnson defended his response to the attack after Mr Merritt’s father criticised newspaper coverage of Mr Johnson’s pledge to review the early release of convicted terrorists
  • Mr Johnson and Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn attended a vigil at the Guildhall near London Bridge to honour those caught up in the attack
  • London Mayor Sadiq Khan said the best way to defeat the hatred shown in the attack was to focus on the values of hope, unity and love
  • BBC News learned the attacker, Usman Khan, 28, had been under investigation by the security service MI5 since his release from prison last year, but given one of the lowest priorities. He had been convicted of a terrorism offence in 2012
  • As part of his release conditions, Khan was obliged to take part in the government’s desistance and disengagement programme – which aims to rehabilitate those involved in terrorism

Vigils for the victims of the attack were also held in Cambridge and Anglia Ruskin University, where Ms Jones had previously attended.

Mr Merritt and Ms Jones both studied for masters degrees at the University of Cambridge’s institute of criminology and had been taking part in an event for its Learning Together programme – which focuses on education within the criminal justice system – when they were killed.

Prof Bain added: “I want to make sure that as much as possible that we uphold the heroes of the day, were formerly incarcerated people, some of the folks who are often easiest to dehumanise.

“They stepped up and many of the folks in that space would not be here today if it weren’t for these guys who did time in prison and literally saved lives.”

In other developments on Monday:

  • Prime Minister Boris Johnson defended his response to the attack after Mr Merritt’s father criticised newspaper coverage of Mr Johnson’s pledge to review the early release of convicted terrorists
  • Mr Johnson and Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn attended a vigil at the Guildhall near London Bridge to honour those caught up in the attack
  • London Mayor Sadiq Khan said the best way to defeat the hatred shown in the attack was to focus on the values of hope, unity and love
  • BBC News learned the attacker, Usman Khan, 28, had been under investigation by the security service MI5 since his release from prison last year, but given one of the lowest priorities. He had been convicted of a terrorism offence in 2012
  • As part of his release conditions, Khan was obliged to take part in the government’s desistance and disengagement programme – which aims to rehabilitate those involved in terrorism

Vigils for the victims of the attack were also held in Cambridge and Anglia Ruskin University, where Ms Jones had previously attended.

Mr Merritt and Ms Jones both studied for masters degrees at the University of Cambridge’s institute of criminology and had been taking part in an event for its Learning Together programme – which focuses on education within the criminal justice system – when they were killed.

The article calls for a justice system that focuses on rehabilitation, rather than revenge, and criticises indeterminate sentences, saying his son worked for “a world where we do not lock up and throw away the key”.

Prof Bain added: “I want to make sure that as much as possible that we uphold the heroes of the day, were formerly incarcerated people, some of the folks who are often easiest to dehumanise.

“They stepped up and many of the folks in that space would not be here today if it weren’t for these guys who did time in prison and literally saved lives.”

In other developments on Monday:

  • Prime Minister Boris Johnson defended his response to the attack after Mr Merritt’s father criticised newspaper coverage of Mr Johnson’s pledge to review the early release of convicted terrorists
  • Mr Johnson and Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn attended a vigil at the Guildhall near London Bridge to honour those caught up in the attack
  • London Mayor Sadiq Khan said the best way to defeat the hatred shown in the attack was to focus on the values of hope, unity and love
  • BBC News learned the attacker, Usman Khan, 28, had been under investigation by the security service MI5 since his release from prison last year, but given one of the lowest priorities. He had been convicted of a terrorism offence in 2012
  • As part of his release conditions, Khan was obliged to take part in the government’s desistance and disengagement programme – which aims to rehabilitate those involved in terrorism

Vigils for the victims of the attack were also held in Cambridge and Anglia Ruskin University, where Ms Jones had previously attended.

Mr Merritt and Ms Jones both studied for masters degrees at the University of Cambridge’s institute of criminology and had been taking part in an event for its Learning Together programme – which focuses on education within the criminal justice system – when they were killed.

Writing in the Guardian, David Merritt says his son “would be seething at his death, and his life, being used to perpetuate an agenda of hate that he gave his everything fighting against”.

The article calls for a justice system that focuses on rehabilitation, rather than revenge, and criticises indeterminate sentences, saying his son worked for “a world where we do not lock up and throw away the key”.

Prof Bain added: “I want to make sure that as much as possible that we uphold the heroes of the day, were formerly incarcerated people, some of the folks who are often easiest to dehumanise.

“They stepped up and many of the folks in that space would not be here today if it weren’t for these guys who did time in prison and literally saved lives.”

In other developments on Monday:

  • Prime Minister Boris Johnson defended his response to the attack after Mr Merritt’s father criticised newspaper coverage of Mr Johnson’s pledge to review the early release of convicted terrorists
  • Mr Johnson and Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn attended a vigil at the Guildhall near London Bridge to honour those caught up in the attack
  • London Mayor Sadiq Khan said the best way to defeat the hatred shown in the attack was to focus on the values of hope, unity and love
  • BBC News learned the attacker, Usman Khan, 28, had been under investigation by the security service MI5 since his release from prison last year, but given one of the lowest priorities. He had been convicted of a terrorism offence in 2012
  • As part of his release conditions, Khan was obliged to take part in the government’s desistance and disengagement programme – which aims to rehabilitate those involved in terrorism

Vigils for the victims of the attack were also held in Cambridge and Anglia Ruskin University, where Ms Jones had previously attended.

Mr Merritt and Ms Jones both studied for masters degrees at the University of Cambridge’s institute of criminology and had been taking part in an event for its Learning Together programme – which focuses on education within the criminal justice system – when they were killed.

Mr Merritt’s father criticised newspaper coverage of Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s pledge to review the early release of convicted terrorists.

Writing in the Guardian, David Merritt says his son “would be seething at his death, and his life, being used to perpetuate an agenda of hate that he gave his everything fighting against”.

The article calls for a justice system that focuses on rehabilitation, rather than revenge, and criticises indeterminate sentences, saying his son worked for “a world where we do not lock up and throw away the key”.

Prof Bain added: “I want to make sure that as much as possible that we uphold the heroes of the day, were formerly incarcerated people, some of the folks who are often easiest to dehumanise.

“They stepped up and many of the folks in that space would not be here today if it weren’t for these guys who did time in prison and literally saved lives.”

In other developments on Monday:

  • Prime Minister Boris Johnson defended his response to the attack after Mr Merritt’s father criticised newspaper coverage of Mr Johnson’s pledge to review the early release of convicted terrorists
  • Mr Johnson and Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn attended a vigil at the Guildhall near London Bridge to honour those caught up in the attack
  • London Mayor Sadiq Khan said the best way to defeat the hatred shown in the attack was to focus on the values of hope, unity and love
  • BBC News learned the attacker, Usman Khan, 28, had been under investigation by the security service MI5 since his release from prison last year, but given one of the lowest priorities. He had been convicted of a terrorism offence in 2012
  • As part of his release conditions, Khan was obliged to take part in the government’s desistance and disengagement programme – which aims to rehabilitate those involved in terrorism

Vigils for the victims of the attack were also held in Cambridge and Anglia Ruskin University, where Ms Jones had previously attended.

Mr Merritt and Ms Jones both studied for masters degrees at the University of Cambridge’s institute of criminology and had been taking part in an event for its Learning Together programme – which focuses on education within the criminal justice system – when they were killed.

“I want to honour him,” Prof Bain said of Mr Merritt. “I want to honour his father’s wishes which have been explicit to not have his life be used for political purposes to ramp up draconian policies, because that’s not what he was about.”

Mr Merritt’s father criticised newspaper coverage of Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s pledge to review the early release of convicted terrorists.

Writing in the Guardian, David Merritt says his son “would be seething at his death, and his life, being used to perpetuate an agenda of hate that he gave his everything fighting against”.

The article calls for a justice system that focuses on rehabilitation, rather than revenge, and criticises indeterminate sentences, saying his son worked for “a world where we do not lock up and throw away the key”.

Prof Bain added: “I want to make sure that as much as possible that we uphold the heroes of the day, were formerly incarcerated people, some of the folks who are often easiest to dehumanise.

“They stepped up and many of the folks in that space would not be here today if it weren’t for these guys who did time in prison and literally saved lives.”

In other developments on Monday:

  • Prime Minister Boris Johnson defended his response to the attack after Mr Merritt’s father criticised newspaper coverage of Mr Johnson’s pledge to review the early release of convicted terrorists
  • Mr Johnson and Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn attended a vigil at the Guildhall near London Bridge to honour those caught up in the attack
  • London Mayor Sadiq Khan said the best way to defeat the hatred shown in the attack was to focus on the values of hope, unity and love
  • BBC News learned the attacker, Usman Khan, 28, had been under investigation by the security service MI5 since his release from prison last year, but given one of the lowest priorities. He had been convicted of a terrorism offence in 2012
  • As part of his release conditions, Khan was obliged to take part in the government’s desistance and disengagement programme – which aims to rehabilitate those involved in terrorism

Vigils for the victims of the attack were also held in Cambridge and Anglia Ruskin University, where Ms Jones had previously attended.

Mr Merritt and Ms Jones both studied for masters degrees at the University of Cambridge’s institute of criminology and had been taking part in an event for its Learning Together programme – which focuses on education within the criminal justice system – when they were killed.

Prof Bain said course co-ordinator Mr Merritt was “the first line of defence”.

“I want to honour him,” Prof Bain said of Mr Merritt. “I want to honour his father’s wishes which have been explicit to not have his life be used for political purposes to ramp up draconian policies, because that’s not what he was about.”

Mr Merritt’s father criticised newspaper coverage of Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s pledge to review the early release of convicted terrorists.

Writing in the Guardian, David Merritt says his son “would be seething at his death, and his life, being used to perpetuate an agenda of hate that he gave his everything fighting against”.

The article calls for a justice system that focuses on rehabilitation, rather than revenge, and criticises indeterminate sentences, saying his son worked for “a world where we do not lock up and throw away the key”.

Prof Bain added: “I want to make sure that as much as possible that we uphold the heroes of the day, were formerly incarcerated people, some of the folks who are often easiest to dehumanise.

“They stepped up and many of the folks in that space would not be here today if it weren’t for these guys who did time in prison and literally saved lives.”

In other developments on Monday:

  • Prime Minister Boris Johnson defended his response to the attack after Mr Merritt’s father criticised newspaper coverage of Mr Johnson’s pledge to review the early release of convicted terrorists
  • Mr Johnson and Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn attended a vigil at the Guildhall near London Bridge to honour those caught up in the attack
  • London Mayor Sadiq Khan said the best way to defeat the hatred shown in the attack was to focus on the values of hope, unity and love
  • BBC News learned the attacker, Usman Khan, 28, had been under investigation by the security service MI5 since his release from prison last year, but given one of the lowest priorities. He had been convicted of a terrorism offence in 2012
  • As part of his release conditions, Khan was obliged to take part in the government’s desistance and disengagement programme – which aims to rehabilitate those involved in terrorism

Vigils for the victims of the attack were also held in Cambridge and Anglia Ruskin University, where Ms Jones had previously attended.

Mr Merritt and Ms Jones both studied for masters degrees at the University of Cambridge’s institute of criminology and had been taking part in an event for its Learning Together programme – which focuses on education within the criminal justice system – when they were killed.

He added: “It felt like a warzone… it felt like total chaos.”

Prof Bain said course co-ordinator Mr Merritt was “the first line of defence”.

“I want to honour him,” Prof Bain said of Mr Merritt. “I want to honour his father’s wishes which have been explicit to not have his life be used for political purposes to ramp up draconian policies, because that’s not what he was about.”

Mr Merritt’s father criticised newspaper coverage of Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s pledge to review the early release of convicted terrorists.

Writing in the Guardian, David Merritt says his son “would be seething at his death, and his life, being used to perpetuate an agenda of hate that he gave his everything fighting against”.

The article calls for a justice system that focuses on rehabilitation, rather than revenge, and criticises indeterminate sentences, saying his son worked for “a world where we do not lock up and throw away the key”.

Prof Bain added: “I want to make sure that as much as possible that we uphold the heroes of the day, were formerly incarcerated people, some of the folks who are often easiest to dehumanise.

“They stepped up and many of the folks in that space would not be here today if it weren’t for these guys who did time in prison and literally saved lives.”

In other developments on Monday:

  • Prime Minister Boris Johnson defended his response to the attack after Mr Merritt’s father criticised newspaper coverage of Mr Johnson’s pledge to review the early release of convicted terrorists
  • Mr Johnson and Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn attended a vigil at the Guildhall near London Bridge to honour those caught up in the attack
  • London Mayor Sadiq Khan said the best way to defeat the hatred shown in the attack was to focus on the values of hope, unity and love
  • BBC News learned the attacker, Usman Khan, 28, had been under investigation by the security service MI5 since his release from prison last year, but given one of the lowest priorities. He had been convicted of a terrorism offence in 2012
  • As part of his release conditions, Khan was obliged to take part in the government’s desistance and disengagement programme – which aims to rehabilitate those involved in terrorism

Vigils for the victims of the attack were also held in Cambridge and Anglia Ruskin University, where Ms Jones had previously attended.

Mr Merritt and Ms Jones both studied for masters degrees at the University of Cambridge’s institute of criminology and had been taking part in an event for its Learning Together programme – which focuses on education within the criminal justice system – when they were killed.

“That’s when I ran down and saw the scene unfolding there,” he said. “I was able to see the attacker.”

He added: “It felt like a warzone… it felt like total chaos.”

Prof Bain said course co-ordinator Mr Merritt was “the first line of defence”.

“I want to honour him,” Prof Bain said of Mr Merritt. “I want to honour his father’s wishes which have been explicit to not have his life be used for political purposes to ramp up draconian policies, because that’s not what he was about.”

Mr Merritt’s father criticised newspaper coverage of Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s pledge to review the early release of convicted terrorists.

Writing in the Guardian, David Merritt says his son “would be seething at his death, and his life, being used to perpetuate an agenda of hate that he gave his everything fighting against”.

The article calls for a justice system that focuses on rehabilitation, rather than revenge, and criticises indeterminate sentences, saying his son worked for “a world where we do not lock up and throw away the key”.

Prof Bain added: “I want to make sure that as much as possible that we uphold the heroes of the day, were formerly incarcerated people, some of the folks who are often easiest to dehumanise.

“They stepped up and many of the folks in that space would not be here today if it weren’t for these guys who did time in prison and literally saved lives.”

In other developments on Monday:

  • Prime Minister Boris Johnson defended his response to the attack after Mr Merritt’s father criticised newspaper coverage of Mr Johnson’s pledge to review the early release of convicted terrorists
  • Mr Johnson and Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn attended a vigil at the Guildhall near London Bridge to honour those caught up in the attack
  • London Mayor Sadiq Khan said the best way to defeat the hatred shown in the attack was to focus on the values of hope, unity and love
  • BBC News learned the attacker, Usman Khan, 28, had been under investigation by the security service MI5 since his release from prison last year, but given one of the lowest priorities. He had been convicted of a terrorism offence in 2012
  • As part of his release conditions, Khan was obliged to take part in the government’s desistance and disengagement programme – which aims to rehabilitate those involved in terrorism

Vigils for the victims of the attack were also held in Cambridge and Anglia Ruskin University, where Ms Jones had previously attended.

Mr Merritt and Ms Jones both studied for masters degrees at the University of Cambridge’s institute of criminology and had been taking part in an event for its Learning Together programme – which focuses on education within the criminal justice system – when they were killed.

He said two men from his workshop immediately ran towards shouts from elsewhere in Fishmongers’ Hall in the City of London as the attack began, and as shouts grew louder he also went to assist.

“That’s when I ran down and saw the scene unfolding there,” he said. “I was able to see the attacker.”

He added: “It felt like a warzone… it felt like total chaos.”

Prof Bain said course co-ordinator Mr Merritt was “the first line of defence”.

“I want to honour him,” Prof Bain said of Mr Merritt. “I want to honour his father’s wishes which have been explicit to not have his life be used for political purposes to ramp up draconian policies, because that’s not what he was about.”

Mr Merritt’s father criticised newspaper coverage of Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s pledge to review the early release of convicted terrorists.

Writing in the Guardian, David Merritt says his son “would be seething at his death, and his life, being used to perpetuate an agenda of hate that he gave his everything fighting against”.

The article calls for a justice system that focuses on rehabilitation, rather than revenge, and criticises indeterminate sentences, saying his son worked for “a world where we do not lock up and throw away the key”.

Prof Bain added: “I want to make sure that as much as possible that we uphold the heroes of the day, were formerly incarcerated people, some of the folks who are often easiest to dehumanise.

“They stepped up and many of the folks in that space would not be here today if it weren’t for these guys who did time in prison and literally saved lives.”

In other developments on Monday:

  • Prime Minister Boris Johnson defended his response to the attack after Mr Merritt’s father criticised newspaper coverage of Mr Johnson’s pledge to review the early release of convicted terrorists
  • Mr Johnson and Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn attended a vigil at the Guildhall near London Bridge to honour those caught up in the attack
  • London Mayor Sadiq Khan said the best way to defeat the hatred shown in the attack was to focus on the values of hope, unity and love
  • BBC News learned the attacker, Usman Khan, 28, had been under investigation by the security service MI5 since his release from prison last year, but given one of the lowest priorities. He had been convicted of a terrorism offence in 2012
  • As part of his release conditions, Khan was obliged to take part in the government’s desistance and disengagement programme – which aims to rehabilitate those involved in terrorism

Vigils for the victims of the attack were also held in Cambridge and Anglia Ruskin University, where Ms Jones had previously attended.

Mr Merritt and Ms Jones both studied for masters degrees at the University of Cambridge’s institute of criminology and had been taking part in an event for its Learning Together programme – which focuses on education within the criminal justice system – when they were killed.

He said two men from his workshop immediately ran towards shouts from elsewhere in Fishmongers’ Hall in the City of London as the attack began, and as shouts grew louder he also went to assist.

“That’s when I ran down and saw the scene unfolding there,” he said. “I was able to see the attacker.”

He added: “It felt like a warzone… it felt like total chaos.”

Prof Bain said course co-ordinator Mr Merritt was “the first line of defence”.

“I want to honour him,” Prof Bain said of Mr Merritt. “I want to honour his father’s wishes which have been explicit to not have his life be used for political purposes to ramp up draconian policies, because that’s not what he was about.”

Mr Merritt’s father criticised newspaper coverage of Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s pledge to review the early release of convicted terrorists.

Writing in the Guardian, David Merritt says his son “would be seething at his death, and his life, being used to perpetuate an agenda of hate that he gave his everything fighting against”.

The article calls for a justice system that focuses on rehabilitation, rather than revenge, and criticises indeterminate sentences, saying his son worked for “a world where we do not lock up and throw away the key”.

Prof Bain added: “I want to make sure that as much as possible that we uphold the heroes of the day, were formerly incarcerated people, some of the folks who are often easiest to dehumanise.

“They stepped up and many of the folks in that space would not be here today if it weren’t for these guys who did time in prison and literally saved lives.”

In other developments on Monday:

  • Prime Minister Boris Johnson defended his response to the attack after Mr Merritt’s father criticised newspaper coverage of Mr Johnson’s pledge to review the early release of convicted terrorists
  • Mr Johnson and Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn attended a vigil at the Guildhall near London Bridge to honour those caught up in the attack
  • London Mayor Sadiq Khan said the best way to defeat the hatred shown in the attack was to focus on the values of hope, unity and love
  • BBC News learned the attacker, Usman Khan, 28, had been under investigation by the security service MI5 since his release from prison last year, but given one of the lowest priorities. He had been convicted of a terrorism offence in 2012
  • As part of his release conditions, Khan was obliged to take part in the government’s desistance and disengagement programme – which aims to rehabilitate those involved in terrorism

Vigils for the victims of the attack were also held in Cambridge and Anglia Ruskin University, where Ms Jones had previously attended.

Mr Merritt and Ms Jones both studied for masters degrees at the University of Cambridge’s institute of criminology and had been taking part in an event for its Learning Together programme – which focuses on education within the criminal justice system – when they were killed.

Prof Bain said former offenders attending the University of Cambridge-linked conference “stepped up and intervened” to tackle Khan, and people at Fishmongers’ Hall owed their lives to the actions of those who had previously spent time in jail.

He said two men from his workshop immediately ran towards shouts from elsewhere in Fishmongers’ Hall in the City of London as the attack began, and as shouts grew louder he also went to assist.

“That’s when I ran down and saw the scene unfolding there,” he said. “I was able to see the attacker.”

He added: “It felt like a warzone… it felt like total chaos.”

Prof Bain said course co-ordinator Mr Merritt was “the first line of defence”.

“I want to honour him,” Prof Bain said of Mr Merritt. “I want to honour his father’s wishes which have been explicit to not have his life be used for political purposes to ramp up draconian policies, because that’s not what he was about.”

Mr Merritt’s father criticised newspaper coverage of Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s pledge to review the early release of convicted terrorists.

Writing in the Guardian, David Merritt says his son “would be seething at his death, and his life, being used to perpetuate an agenda of hate that he gave his everything fighting against”.

The article calls for a justice system that focuses on rehabilitation, rather than revenge, and criticises indeterminate sentences, saying his son worked for “a world where we do not lock up and throw away the key”.

Prof Bain added: “I want to make sure that as much as possible that we uphold the heroes of the day, were formerly incarcerated people, some of the folks who are often easiest to dehumanise.

“They stepped up and many of the folks in that space would not be here today if it weren’t for these guys who did time in prison and literally saved lives.”

In other developments on Monday:

  • Prime Minister Boris Johnson defended his response to the attack after Mr Merritt’s father criticised newspaper coverage of Mr Johnson’s pledge to review the early release of convicted terrorists
  • Mr Johnson and Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn attended a vigil at the Guildhall near London Bridge to honour those caught up in the attack
  • London Mayor Sadiq Khan said the best way to defeat the hatred shown in the attack was to focus on the values of hope, unity and love
  • BBC News learned the attacker, Usman Khan, 28, had been under investigation by the security service MI5 since his release from prison last year, but given one of the lowest priorities. He had been convicted of a terrorism offence in 2012
  • As part of his release conditions, Khan was obliged to take part in the government’s desistance and disengagement programme – which aims to rehabilitate those involved in terrorism

Vigils for the victims of the attack were also held in Cambridge and Anglia Ruskin University, where Ms Jones had previously attended.

Mr Merritt and Ms Jones both studied for masters degrees at the University of Cambridge’s institute of criminology and had been taking part in an event for its Learning Together programme – which focuses on education within the criminal justice system – when they were killed.

Vigils have taken place for Mr Merritt, 25, and Saskia Jones, 23.

Prof Bain said former offenders attending the University of Cambridge-linked conference “stepped up and intervened” to tackle Khan, and people at Fishmongers’ Hall owed their lives to the actions of those who had previously spent time in jail.

He said two men from his workshop immediately ran towards shouts from elsewhere in Fishmongers’ Hall in the City of London as the attack began, and as shouts grew louder he also went to assist.

“That’s when I ran down and saw the scene unfolding there,” he said. “I was able to see the attacker.”

He added: “It felt like a warzone… it felt like total chaos.”

Prof Bain said course co-ordinator Mr Merritt was “the first line of defence”.

“I want to honour him,” Prof Bain said of Mr Merritt. “I want to honour his father’s wishes which have been explicit to not have his life be used for political purposes to ramp up draconian policies, because that’s not what he was about.”

Mr Merritt’s father criticised newspaper coverage of Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s pledge to review the early release of convicted terrorists.

Writing in the Guardian, David Merritt says his son “would be seething at his death, and his life, being used to perpetuate an agenda of hate that he gave his everything fighting against”.

The article calls for a justice system that focuses on rehabilitation, rather than revenge, and criticises indeterminate sentences, saying his son worked for “a world where we do not lock up and throw away the key”.

Prof Bain added: “I want to make sure that as much as possible that we uphold the heroes of the day, were formerly incarcerated people, some of the folks who are often easiest to dehumanise.

“They stepped up and many of the folks in that space would not be here today if it weren’t for these guys who did time in prison and literally saved lives.”

In other developments on Monday:

  • Prime Minister Boris Johnson defended his response to the attack after Mr Merritt’s father criticised newspaper coverage of Mr Johnson’s pledge to review the early release of convicted terrorists
  • Mr Johnson and Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn attended a vigil at the Guildhall near London Bridge to honour those caught up in the attack
  • London Mayor Sadiq Khan said the best way to defeat the hatred shown in the attack was to focus on the values of hope, unity and love
  • BBC News learned the attacker, Usman Khan, 28, had been under investigation by the security service MI5 since his release from prison last year, but given one of the lowest priorities. He had been convicted of a terrorism offence in 2012
  • As part of his release conditions, Khan was obliged to take part in the government’s desistance and disengagement programme – which aims to rehabilitate those involved in terrorism

Vigils for the victims of the attack were also held in Cambridge and Anglia Ruskin University, where Ms Jones had previously attended.

Mr Merritt and Ms Jones both studied for masters degrees at the University of Cambridge’s institute of criminology and had been taking part in an event for its Learning Together programme – which focuses on education within the criminal justice system – when they were killed.

“I saw people die, I saw things that I will never be able to unsee,” he said.

Vigils have taken place for Mr Merritt, 25, and Saskia Jones, 23.

Prof Bain said former offenders attending the University of Cambridge-linked conference “stepped up and intervened” to tackle Khan, and people at Fishmongers’ Hall owed their lives to the actions of those who had previously spent time in jail.

He said two men from his workshop immediately ran towards shouts from elsewhere in Fishmongers’ Hall in the City of London as the attack began, and as shouts grew louder he also went to assist.

“That’s when I ran down and saw the scene unfolding there,” he said. “I was able to see the attacker.”

He added: “It felt like a warzone… it felt like total chaos.”

Prof Bain said course co-ordinator Mr Merritt was “the first line of defence”.

“I want to honour him,” Prof Bain said of Mr Merritt. “I want to honour his father’s wishes which have been explicit to not have his life be used for political purposes to ramp up draconian policies, because that’s not what he was about.”

Mr Merritt’s father criticised newspaper coverage of Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s pledge to review the early release of convicted terrorists.

Writing in the Guardian, David Merritt says his son “would be seething at his death, and his life, being used to perpetuate an agenda of hate that he gave his everything fighting against”.

The article calls for a justice system that focuses on rehabilitation, rather than revenge, and criticises indeterminate sentences, saying his son worked for “a world where we do not lock up and throw away the key”.

Prof Bain added: “I want to make sure that as much as possible that we uphold the heroes of the day, were formerly incarcerated people, some of the folks who are often easiest to dehumanise.

“They stepped up and many of the folks in that space would not be here today if it weren’t for these guys who did time in prison and literally saved lives.”

In other developments on Monday:

  • Prime Minister Boris Johnson defended his response to the attack after Mr Merritt’s father criticised newspaper coverage of Mr Johnson’s pledge to review the early release of convicted terrorists
  • Mr Johnson and Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn attended a vigil at the Guildhall near London Bridge to honour those caught up in the attack
  • London Mayor Sadiq Khan said the best way to defeat the hatred shown in the attack was to focus on the values of hope, unity and love
  • BBC News learned the attacker, Usman Khan, 28, had been under investigation by the security service MI5 since his release from prison last year, but given one of the lowest priorities. He had been convicted of a terrorism offence in 2012
  • As part of his release conditions, Khan was obliged to take part in the government’s desistance and disengagement programme – which aims to rehabilitate those involved in terrorism

Vigils for the victims of the attack were also held in Cambridge and Anglia Ruskin University, where Ms Jones had previously attended.

Mr Merritt and Ms Jones both studied for masters degrees at the University of Cambridge’s institute of criminology and had been taking part in an event for its Learning Together programme – which focuses on education within the criminal justice system – when they were killed.

Bryonn Bain told the BBC that victim Jack Merritt was the first person to confront Usman Khan when he launched his knife assault during a prisoner rehabilitation conference on Friday.

“I saw people die, I saw things that I will never be able to unsee,” he said.

Vigils have taken place for Mr Merritt, 25, and Saskia Jones, 23.

Prof Bain said former offenders attending the University of Cambridge-linked conference “stepped up and intervened” to tackle Khan, and people at Fishmongers’ Hall owed their lives to the actions of those who had previously spent time in jail.

He said two men from his workshop immediately ran towards shouts from elsewhere in Fishmongers’ Hall in the City of London as the attack began, and as shouts grew louder he also went to assist.

“That’s when I ran down and saw the scene unfolding there,” he said. “I was able to see the attacker.”

He added: “It felt like a warzone… it felt like total chaos.”

Prof Bain said course co-ordinator Mr Merritt was “the first line of defence”.

“I want to honour him,” Prof Bain said of Mr Merritt. “I want to honour his father’s wishes which have been explicit to not have his life be used for political purposes to ramp up draconian policies, because that’s not what he was about.”

Mr Merritt’s father criticised newspaper coverage of Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s pledge to review the early release of convicted terrorists.

Writing in the Guardian, David Merritt says his son “would be seething at his death, and his life, being used to perpetuate an agenda of hate that he gave his everything fighting against”.

The article calls for a justice system that focuses on rehabilitation, rather than revenge, and criticises indeterminate sentences, saying his son worked for “a world where we do not lock up and throw away the key”.

Prof Bain added: “I want to make sure that as much as possible that we uphold the heroes of the day, were formerly incarcerated people, some of the folks who are often easiest to dehumanise.

“They stepped up and many of the folks in that space would not be here today if it weren’t for these guys who did time in prison and literally saved lives.”

In other developments on Monday:

  • Prime Minister Boris Johnson defended his response to the attack after Mr Merritt’s father criticised newspaper coverage of Mr Johnson’s pledge to review the early release of convicted terrorists
  • Mr Johnson and Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn attended a vigil at the Guildhall near London Bridge to honour those caught up in the attack
  • London Mayor Sadiq Khan said the best way to defeat the hatred shown in the attack was to focus on the values of hope, unity and love
  • BBC News learned the attacker, Usman Khan, 28, had been under investigation by the security service MI5 since his release from prison last year, but given one of the lowest priorities. He had been convicted of a terrorism offence in 2012
  • As part of his release conditions, Khan was obliged to take part in the government’s desistance and disengagement programme – which aims to rehabilitate those involved in terrorism

Vigils for the victims of the attack were also held in Cambridge and Anglia Ruskin University, where Ms Jones had previously attended.

Mr Merritt and Ms Jones both studied for masters degrees at the University of Cambridge’s institute of criminology and had been taking part in an event for its Learning Together programme – which focuses on education within the criminal justice system – when they were killed.

An American academic has given a graphic account of the moment the London Bridge stabbing attack began, saying it “felt like a warzone”.

Bryonn Bain told the BBC that victim Jack Merritt was the first person to confront Usman Khan when he launched his knife assault during a prisoner rehabilitation conference on Friday.

“I saw people die, I saw things that I will never be able to unsee,” he said.

Vigils have taken place for Mr Merritt, 25, and Saskia Jones, 23.

Prof Bain said former offenders attending the University of Cambridge-linked conference “stepped up and intervened” to tackle Khan, and people at Fishmongers’ Hall owed their lives to the actions of those who had previously spent time in jail.

He said two men from his workshop immediately ran towards shouts from elsewhere in Fishmongers’ Hall in the City of London as the attack began, and as shouts grew louder he also went to assist.

“That’s when I ran down and saw the scene unfolding there,” he said. “I was able to see the attacker.”

He added: “It felt like a warzone… it felt like total chaos.”

Prof Bain said course co-ordinator Mr Merritt was “the first line of defence”.

“I want to honour him,” Prof Bain said of Mr Merritt. “I want to honour his father’s wishes which have been explicit to not have his life be used for political purposes to ramp up draconian policies, because that’s not what he was about.”

Mr Merritt’s father criticised newspaper coverage of Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s pledge to review the early release of convicted terrorists.

Writing in the Guardian, David Merritt says his son “would be seething at his death, and his life, being used to perpetuate an agenda of hate that he gave his everything fighting against”.

The article calls for a justice system that focuses on rehabilitation, rather than revenge, and criticises indeterminate sentences, saying his son worked for “a world where we do not lock up and throw away the key”.

Prof Bain added: “I want to make sure that as much as possible that we uphold the heroes of the day, were formerly incarcerated people, some of the folks who are often easiest to dehumanise.

“They stepped up and many of the folks in that space would not be here today if it weren’t for these guys who did time in prison and literally saved lives.”

In other developments on Monday:

  • Prime Minister Boris Johnson defended his response to the attack after Mr Merritt’s father criticised newspaper coverage of Mr Johnson’s pledge to review the early release of convicted terrorists
  • Mr Johnson and Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn attended a vigil at the Guildhall near London Bridge to honour those caught up in the attack
  • London Mayor Sadiq Khan said the best way to defeat the hatred shown in the attack was to focus on the values of hope, unity and love
  • BBC News learned the attacker, Usman Khan, 28, had been under investigation by the security service MI5 since his release from prison last year, but given one of the lowest priorities. He had been convicted of a terrorism offence in 2012
  • As part of his release conditions, Khan was obliged to take part in the government’s desistance and disengagement programme – which aims to rehabilitate those involved in terrorism

Vigils for the victims of the attack were also held in Cambridge and Anglia Ruskin University, where Ms Jones had previously attended.

Mr Merritt and Ms Jones both studied for masters degrees at the University of Cambridge’s institute of criminology and had been taking part in an event for its Learning Together programme – which focuses on education within the criminal justice system – when they were killed.

An American academic has given a graphic account of the moment the London Bridge stabbing attack began, saying it “felt like a warzone”.

Bryonn Bain told the BBC that victim Jack Merritt was the first person to confront Usman Khan when he launched his knife assault during a prisoner rehabilitation conference on Friday.

“I saw people die, I saw things that I will never be able to unsee,” he said.

Vigils have taken place for Mr Merritt, 25, and Saskia Jones, 23.

Prof Bain said former offenders attending the University of Cambridge-linked conference “stepped up and intervened” to tackle Khan, and people at Fishmongers’ Hall owed their lives to the actions of those who had previously spent time in jail.

He said two men from his workshop immediately ran towards shouts from elsewhere in Fishmongers’ Hall in the City of London as the attack began, and as shouts grew louder he also went to assist.

“That’s when I ran down and saw the scene unfolding there,” he said. “I was able to see the attacker.”

He added: “It felt like a warzone… it felt like total chaos.”

Prof Bain said course co-ordinator Mr Merritt was “the first line of defence”.

“I want to honour him,” Prof Bain said of Mr Merritt. “I want to honour his father’s wishes which have been explicit to not have his life be used for political purposes to ramp up draconian policies, because that’s not what he was about.”

Mr Merritt’s father criticised newspaper coverage of Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s pledge to review the early release of convicted terrorists.

Writing in the Guardian, David Merritt says his son “would be seething at his death, and his life, being used to perpetuate an agenda of hate that he gave his everything fighting against”.

The article calls for a justice system that focuses on rehabilitation, rather than revenge, and criticises indeterminate sentences, saying his son worked for “a world where we do not lock up and throw away the key”.

Prof Bain added: “I want to make sure that as much as possible that we uphold the heroes of the day, were formerly incarcerated people, some of the folks who are often easiest to dehumanise.

“They stepped up and many of the folks in that space would not be here today if it weren’t for these guys who did time in prison and literally saved lives.”

In other developments on Monday:

  • Prime Minister Boris Johnson defended his response to the attack after Mr Merritt’s father criticised newspaper coverage of Mr Johnson’s pledge to review the early release of convicted terrorists
  • Mr Johnson and Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn attended a vigil at the Guildhall near London Bridge to honour those caught up in the attack
  • London Mayor Sadiq Khan said the best way to defeat the hatred shown in the attack was to focus on the values of hope, unity and love
  • BBC News learned the attacker, Usman Khan, 28, had been under investigation by the security service MI5 since his release from prison last year, but given one of the lowest priorities. He had been convicted of a terrorism offence in 2012
  • As part of his release conditions, Khan was obliged to take part in the government’s desistance and disengagement programme – which aims to rehabilitate those involved in terrorism

Vigils for the victims of the attack were also held in Cambridge and Anglia Ruskin University, where Ms Jones had previously attended.

Mr Merritt and Ms Jones both studied for masters degrees at the University of Cambridge’s institute of criminology and had been taking part in an event for its Learning Together programme – which focuses on education within the criminal justice system – when they were killed.

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Prince Andrew accuser asks public to ‘stand beside her’

She said that later that evening, she had sex with Prince Andrew upstairs at Maxwell’s house in Belgravia.

“In the car Ghislaine tells me that I have to do for Andrew what I do for Jeffrey and that just made me sick.”

She said that later that evening, she had sex with Prince Andrew upstairs at Maxwell’s house in Belgravia.

When they had left the club, Ms Giuffre said Ghislaine Maxwell gave her instructions.

“In the car Ghislaine tells me that I have to do for Andrew what I do for Jeffrey and that just made me sick.”

She said that later that evening, she had sex with Prince Andrew upstairs at Maxwell’s house in Belgravia.

“He is the most hideous dancer I’ve ever seen in my life”, she says. “His sweat was like it was raining basically everywhere”.

When they had left the club, Ms Giuffre said Ghislaine Maxwell gave her instructions.

“In the car Ghislaine tells me that I have to do for Andrew what I do for Jeffrey and that just made me sick.”

She said that later that evening, she had sex with Prince Andrew upstairs at Maxwell’s house in Belgravia.

She said that she, the prince, Epstein and his then girlfriend, the socialite Ghislaine Maxwell, took her to Tramp night club in London, where the Prince asked her to dance.

“He is the most hideous dancer I’ve ever seen in my life”, she says. “His sweat was like it was raining basically everywhere”.

When they had left the club, Ms Giuffre said Ghislaine Maxwell gave her instructions.

“In the car Ghislaine tells me that I have to do for Andrew what I do for Jeffrey and that just made me sick.”

She said that later that evening, she had sex with Prince Andrew upstairs at Maxwell’s house in Belgravia.

Virginia Giuffre, formerly Virginia Roberts, has given her first interview for British television as part of a special hour-long Panorama. Her interview includes her account of how she was introduced to Prince Andrew.

She said that she, the prince, Epstein and his then girlfriend, the socialite Ghislaine Maxwell, took her to Tramp night club in London, where the Prince asked her to dance.

“He is the most hideous dancer I’ve ever seen in my life”, she says. “His sweat was like it was raining basically everywhere”.

When they had left the club, Ms Giuffre said Ghislaine Maxwell gave her instructions.

“In the car Ghislaine tells me that I have to do for Andrew what I do for Jeffrey and that just made me sick.”

She said that later that evening, she had sex with Prince Andrew upstairs at Maxwell’s house in Belgravia.

The prince has “categorically” denied any sexual contact with Ms Giuffre.

Virginia Giuffre, formerly Virginia Roberts, has given her first interview for British television as part of a special hour-long Panorama. Her interview includes her account of how she was introduced to Prince Andrew.

She said that she, the prince, Epstein and his then girlfriend, the socialite Ghislaine Maxwell, took her to Tramp night club in London, where the Prince asked her to dance.

“He is the most hideous dancer I’ve ever seen in my life”, she says. “His sweat was like it was raining basically everywhere”.

When they had left the club, Ms Giuffre said Ghislaine Maxwell gave her instructions.

“In the car Ghislaine tells me that I have to do for Andrew what I do for Jeffrey and that just made me sick.”

She said that later that evening, she had sex with Prince Andrew upstairs at Maxwell’s house in Belgravia.

She describes how Epstein’s girlfriend told her what “to do for Andrew”.

The prince has “categorically” denied any sexual contact with Ms Giuffre.

Virginia Giuffre, formerly Virginia Roberts, has given her first interview for British television as part of a special hour-long Panorama. Her interview includes her account of how she was introduced to Prince Andrew.

She said that she, the prince, Epstein and his then girlfriend, the socialite Ghislaine Maxwell, took her to Tramp night club in London, where the Prince asked her to dance.

“He is the most hideous dancer I’ve ever seen in my life”, she says. “His sweat was like it was raining basically everywhere”.

When they had left the club, Ms Giuffre said Ghislaine Maxwell gave her instructions.

“In the car Ghislaine tells me that I have to do for Andrew what I do for Jeffrey and that just made me sick.”

She said that later that evening, she had sex with Prince Andrew upstairs at Maxwell’s house in Belgravia.

Virginia Giuffre, one of convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein’s accusers, says she was trafficked to London by Epstein in 2001.

She describes how Epstein’s girlfriend told her what “to do for Andrew”.

The prince has “categorically” denied any sexual contact with Ms Giuffre.

Virginia Giuffre, formerly Virginia Roberts, has given her first interview for British television as part of a special hour-long Panorama. Her interview includes her account of how she was introduced to Prince Andrew.

She said that she, the prince, Epstein and his then girlfriend, the socialite Ghislaine Maxwell, took her to Tramp night club in London, where the Prince asked her to dance.

“He is the most hideous dancer I’ve ever seen in my life”, she says. “His sweat was like it was raining basically everywhere”.

When they had left the club, Ms Giuffre said Ghislaine Maxwell gave her instructions.

“In the car Ghislaine tells me that I have to do for Andrew what I do for Jeffrey and that just made me sick.”

She said that later that evening, she had sex with Prince Andrew upstairs at Maxwell’s house in Belgravia.

A US woman who says she was brought to Britain aged 17 to have sex with Prince Andrew has implored the British public to “stand beside her” and “not accept what has happened to her”.

Virginia Giuffre, one of convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein’s accusers, says she was trafficked to London by Epstein in 2001.

She describes how Epstein’s girlfriend told her what “to do for Andrew”.

The prince has “categorically” denied any sexual contact with Ms Giuffre.

Virginia Giuffre, formerly Virginia Roberts, has given her first interview for British television as part of a special hour-long Panorama. Her interview includes her account of how she was introduced to Prince Andrew.

She said that she, the prince, Epstein and his then girlfriend, the socialite Ghislaine Maxwell, took her to Tramp night club in London, where the Prince asked her to dance.

“He is the most hideous dancer I’ve ever seen in my life”, she says. “His sweat was like it was raining basically everywhere”.

When they had left the club, Ms Giuffre said Ghislaine Maxwell gave her instructions.

“In the car Ghislaine tells me that I have to do for Andrew what I do for Jeffrey and that just made me sick.”

She said that later that evening, she had sex with Prince Andrew upstairs at Maxwell’s house in Belgravia.

A US woman who says she was brought to Britain aged 17 to have sex with Prince Andrew has implored the British public to “stand beside her” and “not accept what has happened to her”.

Virginia Giuffre, one of convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein’s accusers, says she was trafficked to London by Epstein in 2001.

She describes how Epstein’s girlfriend told her what “to do for Andrew”.

The prince has “categorically” denied any sexual contact with Ms Giuffre.

Virginia Giuffre, formerly Virginia Roberts, has given her first interview for British television as part of a special hour-long Panorama. Her interview includes her account of how she was introduced to Prince Andrew.

She said that she, the prince, Epstein and his then girlfriend, the socialite Ghislaine Maxwell, took her to Tramp night club in London, where the Prince asked her to dance.

“He is the most hideous dancer I’ve ever seen in my life”, she says. “His sweat was like it was raining basically everywhere”.

When they had left the club, Ms Giuffre said Ghislaine Maxwell gave her instructions.

“In the car Ghislaine tells me that I have to do for Andrew what I do for Jeffrey and that just made me sick.”

She said that later that evening, she had sex with Prince Andrew upstairs at Maxwell’s house in Belgravia.